Visit Main Street Lufkin
[1]    Little more than 100 years ago, Lufkin existed only in the minds of men. When the H.E. & W.T. R.R. sold lots, September 12, 1882, buyers stood in line. Many were merchants from nearby Homer. Lufkin soon became the shipping center for logs and lumber cut by little sawmills that sprang from the forests.
 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[2]    The town's growth was rapid and at random. On Cotton Square, all stores opened early and closed late, and saloons thrived. In 1890, Lufkin incorporated. The new Town Marshal earned as much as the mayor, ten dollars a month. One of his duties was collecting taxes from merchants, peddlers, salesmen, and road shows.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[3]    In 1890, The Standpipe, a towering black cylinder, was erected on the Square to store the city's water. At its base, a shed housed a pair of hose reels. Frequent fire alarms brought men running. If no mule teams showed up, they grabbed the reel ropes and ran for the fire. After two disastrous fires in the early 1900's, codes required fire-proof buildings.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[4]    Lufkin had dozens of saloons in the downtown area, but in 1911, Lufkin's mothers and their children rallied on Cotton Square to protest the serving of liquor. Placards read: 'Home Is All We Have. Save Our Boys. No More Whiskey.' They rallied again in 1915 and by 1918, the saloons were closed.

 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[5]    In 1917, the United States entered W.W. I. Young men of Angelina County eagerly joined Company M, led by Capt. Kit McConnico. On November 11, 1918, when armistice was declared, the town went wild! Downtown, people shouted, paraded, blew horns and shot guns. The revelry continued, day and night, while the bands played on.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[6]    Many parades have passed First St. and Lufkin Ave. The annual County Fair Parade brought thousands to attend and thrill to martial Band music of town bands, Boy Scout and booster bands, and Lufkin's Famous Hoo Hoo Band. In 1938, a spontaneous parade celebrated the visit of Douglass 'Wrong Way' Corrigan after a 'navigational error' took him to Dublin, Ireland instead of California.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[7]    From 1941 to 1945, winning W.W. II had priority. Lufkin's major industries operated around the clock, and business men sold war bonds over radio from the First National Bank. Bonds were delivered by Boy Scouts, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Texas State Guards, and Legionnaires. Women brought homemade food for everyone during each drive.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[8]    One of Lufkin's early mayors was businessman and civic leader, W.M. Glenn. He became mayor in 1899 on a platform to 'put up the hogs'. After his election, roaming hogs were rounded up and fenced, but 'hog folks' kept cutting the barbed wire. Finally, hogs were housed in the jail, which the inmates strongly protested.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[9]    Horseless Carriages hastened the paving of downtown streets in 1915. Mayor C. N. Humason, a 'kodaker,' documented the event. Streets once sporting 'No Fishing' signs in rain-filled holes, were paved. Among them, two blocks of Lufkin Avenue, from Cotton Square to Courthouse Square.
 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[10]    On the Courthouse Square, farmers tied up their teams and wagons when they came to town for political rallies or to buy supplies. Across the square on Second Street, sometimes called 'Spit and Whittle,' the first Brookshire Bros. store, forerunner of today's supermarket chain, was located. Politicians like W. Lee O'Daniel and his western band often campaigned here.
 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[11]    From the time Angelina County was formed in 1846, factions disputed about the location of the county seat. In 1891, the courthouse at Homer burned. Many blamed it on arson by Lufkinites, who lost no time capturing the title of County Seat, on January 2, 1892.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[12]    Ottie was not just a family carriage horse. She was 'special.' She led funerals and parades, pulled the first ice wagon and galloped to fires with hose cart in tow. Everybody knew Ottie. In 1917, she died at age 44. Her marble grave stone, later moved to the Humason family burial plot, reads, 'A Faithful Old Mare.'

 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[13]    In the Thirties, Louis Markus had a cafe at 108 E. Lufkin Avenue. It was a popular place to meet for coffee and pie or a hot plate lunch. In the twenties, thirties and forties, most cafes were downtown. The 1933 City Directory lists thirty within walking distance of one another.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[14]    In the 1920s, '30s, and '40s, the south 100 block of First Street, better known as 'Main Street,' became the busiest shopping area in town. The newly restored Pate Bldg., c. 1924, had professional offices upstairs. Trevathan's Drug was downstairs; The Normandie Shop next door.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[15]    In 1925, the new Pines Theater had facilities for showing the 'talkies', and a pipe organ to accompany silent films and events like the 'Mystery Wedding.' In fall, 1929, hundreds of people waited at the theater. At 8:00 p.m., parting curtains revealed the wedding scene, followed by the ceremony uniting the mystery couple, Thurmond Otto McKinney and Miss Mary Fae Smith.
 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[16]    The Angelina Hotel, was built in 1922 at a cost of $200,000. Its management was excellent, its restaurant suberb. The spacious ballroom of new-classical design, with paneled walls and flawless hardwood floor, was the scene of many of Lufkin's gala social events for over three decades.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[17]    In 1920, H. & J. Abram was owned by Harry and Joe, brothers of Simon, a Polish/Russian immigrant, the first person to buy a lot on September 12, 1882 in the new town of Lufkin. In 1953, Harry's son, Leo, sold Abrams store on First Street, ending over seventy years of Abrams family service in Lufkin.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[18]    Lufkin's first five and ten cent store was Newton's at 104 S. First Street. In 1915, the five Perry Brothers bought Mr. Newton out. Their goal, a store for each, was reached by 1918. Today, their legacy is a corporation with well over 100 stores in Texas and Louisiana.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[19]    By the Twenties, First Street at Lufkin Avenue was the busiest intersection in town. Automobile speed limits were 8 miles an hour, reduced to 5 miles when turning corners. The Southwest corner was known as Jellybean Corner, a Jellybean being a young man that stood around watching the girls go by.
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[20]    Lufkin's famous Hoo Hoo Band had a rehearsal hall on Lufkin Avenue, in the building where Joseph Kerr's sheetmetal business was originally located. This talented group wrote and produced plays and musicals and designed scenery and props. In 1909, to capitalize on their success, businessmen organized a stock company and built a 1,000 seat Opera House where some of the Texas' finest shows were presented.

 
 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[21]    Trains brought the sound of whistles to Lufkin. Sawmill and industry whistles were time-keepers. Whistles blew for emergencies and celebrations. Some people remember the mournful sound of the Long Bell Lumber Co. whistle when it closed in 1930. Today, a remnant of the haunting steam engine whistle can be heard in the diesel engine horn as it travels the old H.E. & W.T. route.

 

Visit Main Street Lufkin
[22]    In 1913, a mysterious dynamite explosion destroyed Lufkin's Victorian railroad depot. A body believed to be that of the station master was found, but it turned out to be an animal. The station master was later found in California, expedited to Lufkin, tried for the crime in Center, and acquitted.